Uwe Baltner loves to sing

It is September 2018. Uwe Baltner has left a job as a journalist writing stories for a local newspaper in Stuttgart, southern Germany. He is now one half of Baumann & Baltner an advertising agency. He has 400 Instagram followers and drives a Fiat 500 to work every day. The drive to and from his new workplace is 30-45 minutes long, most of it due to traffic jams. He decides to fill the void with audiobooks and podcasts, but he soon runs out of any he finds interesting, so he goes back to a childhood love, he starts singing.

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Wana Udobang keeps hope alive in her new album

I heard Wana Udobang perform ‘The Banquet’ at the Ake Arts and Book Festival of 2015, using the preparation of a feast as metaphor for the many lessons life teaches us, she kept the audience spellbound. I watched as she swiveled on stage, pouring her soul into the performance, her husky voice washing over the audience.

Wana is perhaps the only poet I know who sheds real tears while performing her own poems. She believes in immersing oneself in art, whether you are consuming or producing. With her, it is go deep or go home.

By the time of the release of her album ‘In Memory of Forgetting’, I already knew most of the poems in it, as I had heard her perform them on several stages, including the Lagos International Poetry Festival in 2016 and could recite many of the lines by heart. Still, I was close to tears when I listened to the second poem titled ‘Untitled’.

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Revolutionary verses – A review of Ndukwe Onuoha’s poetry album

Ndukwe Onuoha is a poet and spoken word artist who draws his inspiration from human stories and everyday life. Some of the more memorable lines you will hear him perform are:

Change may come some day,

Change may come some way,

But that day is not today.

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‘We are lucky who have loved and been loved’ – Yewande Omotoso

Yewande Omotoso’s debut novel ‘Bomboy’ won the South African Literary Award for First Time Author and was shortlisted for the 2012 Sunday Times Fiction Prize.

‘Bomboy’ was also shortlisted for the 2012 Sunday Times Fiction Prize, and made it to the final three at the inaugural edition of the Etisalat Prize For Literature in 2013. In Bomboy, Yewande Omotoso showed that she had the ability to dwell on the smallness and yet uniqueness of a single person’s life. That she is adept at this is established by her masterful storytelling in her second book: ‘The woman next door.’

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